Energy 101: Geothermal Energy

See how we can generate clean, renewable energy from hot water sources deep beneath the Earth’s surface. The video highlights the basic principles at work in geothermal energy production, and illustrates three different ways the Earth’s heat can be converted into electricity.

Transcript:
http://energy.gov/eere/videos/energy-101-geothermal-energy

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Iceland
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40 thoughts on “Energy 101: Geothermal Energy”

  1. About this video. It's a good video, but has some errors. Just so you know: (1) Dry steam plants are not the "most common type" of geothermal plants in or U.S. or in the world. Flash plants are the most common in the world, dry steam fields are rare, but large, providing steam to numerous plants each. (2) In flash plants, the "fluid" (hot water and steam from underground) that is described in this video can either rise forcefully up wells under it's own power, or be pumped up the well. (3) Cooling of the hot geothermal water does not cause it to flash to steam. Rather, the very hot (over boiling) geothermal water remains as mostly water underground because of the high pressures deep underground. Being released from the high pressures at the surface is what causes it to flash. Cooling it actually causes it to revert to water and contract (as is what happens at the back of the turbine, where it passes through a condenser unit. Flashing is an expansion and the pressure of the expansion is what drives the turbine blades. (4) In the geothermal industry, the "heat transfer fluid" used in binary geothermal power plants is more commonly called the "working fluid." You can look up the definitions of both terms to understand why working fluid is the better term for binary geothermal plants.

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  2. +U.S. Department of Energy Wow parece ser bem promissor 🙂 Mais isso não poderia resfriar o núcleo da Terra a longo prazo?

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  3. Here is the rest of the answer The largest power station by far is Kárahnjúkar Hydropower Plant (690 MW), which generates electricity in the area north of Vatnajökull for the production of aluminum.
    Other projects and stations include:
    Blöndustöð generates 150 MW
    Búrfellsstöð generates 270 MW
    Hrauneyjafosstöð generates 210 MW
    Laxárstöðvar, on the Laxá River, generates 28 MW
    Sigöldustöð generates 150 MW
    Sogsstöðvar generates 89 MW
    Sultartangastöð generates 120 MW
    Vatnsfellsstöð generates 90 MW

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  4. The largest power station by far is Kárahnjúkar Hydropower Plant (690 MW), which generates electricity in the area north of Vatnajökull for the production of aluminum.

    Other projects and stations include:

    Blöndustöð generates 150 MW
    Búrfellsstöð generates 270 MW
    Hrauneyjafosstöð generates 210 MW
    Laxárstöðvar, on the Laxá River, generates 28 MW
    Sigöldustöð generates 150 MW
    Sogsstöðvar generates 89 MW
    Sultartangastöð generates 120 MW
    Vatnsfellsstöð generates 90 MW

    Reply
  5. most of icelands electricity comes from hydropower not from geothermal. 90% of hot water comes from geothermal, which produces about 30 % of electricity needs

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