Amazing sights and reflections from 30 years of wildlife films

Award-winning wildlife documentary makers, Dereck and Beverley Joubert have spent the majority of the last 30 years surrounded by wilderness and wild animals. During that amount of time one is bound to see some incredible things. Luckily for us, they had a camera and know what to do with it. This clip shows some of the wildest, most unusual and intensive hunting sequences ever seen, the results of 30 dedicated years in the bush.

National  Geographic Documentary - African Wild Dog - Wildlife Animal

The African wild dog, African hunting dog, African painted dog, Cape hunting dog or painted wolf (Lycaon pictus) is a canid native to Sub-Saharan Africa. It is the largest of its family in Africa, and the only extant member of the genus Lycaon, which is distinguished from Canis by its fewer toes and its dentition, which is highly specialised for a hypercarnivorous diet. It is classified as endangered by the IUCN, as it has disappeared from much of its original range. The current population has been estimated at roughly 39 subpopulations containing 6,600 adults, only 1,400 of which are fully grown.[2] The decline of these populations is ongoing, due to habitat fragmentation, human persecution, and disease outbreaks.

The African wild dog is a highly social animal, living in packs with separate dominance hierarchies for males and females. Uniquely among social carnivores, it is the females rather than the males that scatter from the natal pack once sexually mature, and the young are allowed to feed first on carcasses. The species is a specialised diurnal hunter of antelopes, which it catches by chasing them to exhaustion. Like other canids, it regurgitates food for its young, but this action is also extended to adults, to the point of being the bedrock of African wild dog social life. It has few natural predators, though lions are a major source of mortality, and spotted hyenas are frequent kleptoparasites.

Although not as prominent in African folklore or culture as other African carnivores, it has been respected in several hunter-gatherer societies, particularly those of the predynastic Egyptians and the San people.
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