20 thoughts on “P-N junction solar cells”

  1. im always wondering since electrons move to the bulb light doest it vanish? i mean there is an amount of electrons and photons is a cause that moves electrons not bring another one from the sun

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  2. Great work !! simple to understand but there is small mistake. HOLES never come out of the bond into the external wire then only travel in bonds.Other mistake is electrons that travel in doesnt support current.Only free electrons support conduction.Thanks you

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  3. i am totally confuse how it works when ntype and ptype are attached holes from ptype move in ntype and electrons go to ptype due to this process a space charge region is created now no electrons cross the juntions means electrons in n and holes are in ptype so what happens when light strikes to n and p material does electrons cross the space charge region like diode when they r forward biased or they dont cross the depletion region

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  4. i always got to the point of understanding the PN junction but somehow not how to get a current out of that…three minutes of your video and everything is clear to me. thanks guys!

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  5. A verbal explanation would be nice. Why don't ions from both sides move across the junction until it reaches an equilibrium state (neutral)? What is stopping this from happening?

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  6. any help please, the videos states that the electron hole pair generated at the junction while as i have been read about solar cells the e-h pair generated in p side.

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  7. Great vid, thank you! Two things are confusing me though:
    How do holes move across? Isn't a hole just the lack of an electron?  By saying holes move across does he actually mean that holes are formed on the N type side because electrons are moved to the p-type side?

    Why does the equilibrium stop within a limited region and not throughout? i.e. what stops the electrons adjacent to the positive region moving into it?

    Thank you for any help!

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